Home / Family / Letters to Our Children: I Pray You Grow Out of Asthma

Letters to Our Children: I Pray You Grow Out of Asthma

This month, I wrote a letter to our six-year-old, A.J. about his breathing condition. My husband, Antoine Sr. coped with asthma as a little boy  and since it’s hereditary, A.J. developed it too. It’s one thing of many things these two share besides the same name.

Letters to Our Children

Dear A.J.,

I hoped that the school year would start out healthier for you. But it didn’t take long for a cold and runny nose to agitate your asthma. I’m so sorry that it kept you home from school for almost three days. I know how much you enjoy seeing your teachers and friends. You’re in a fun gifted class that you love to talk about and I love to hear how you’re making new discoveries every week.

This time I think an extra few germs creeped in and made you even sicker. As we sat in the pediatrician’s office and you got the breathing treatment that helps to clear the congestion, you suddenly, “I think I’m going to…..” – you threw up with the mask still on your face. I ran out of the examination room to get the nurses to help us.

A.J. Asthma

 

A.J. in hospital gown

 

 

As gross and disgusting as it was, I could tell you immediately felt better once whatever was in your stomach was out. Unfortunately, the vomit got all over your clothes so you had to go home in a hospital gown. Thank you for being so understanding when Mama was freaking out. It was not my finest motherhood moment. You’ve thrown up on him more than me, so he knows how to handle it better.

Thankfully, we can stay stocked with your asthma control medication at home through Dada’s medical insurance. They mail your medication to our house at no cost! I wish it was just as affordable to handle the cost of your EpiPen Junior since both are what we need to keep you alive in an emergency.

My prayer is that you will grow out of asthma just like Dada did. I want you to enjoy sports and winter activities like the rest of your friends. I pray that your chest won’t continue to feel tight, you won’t have labored breathing and we won’t need to keep going to the doctor for steroids.

I pray that Father God heals you and fixes the swelling and tightness in your chest, while helping you to keep your loving, positive outlook until the day you no longer need medication.

Love, Mama

In case you’re new here, I’d love for you to read and share this apology letter to A.J. for being an only child. Letters to Our Children: I’m Sorry We Didn’t Give You A Siblings.

For other asthma families, here’s some resources for Childhood Asthma from the Mayo Clinic.

About Joyce Brewer

Creator & Host of Mommy Talk Show. Emmy award-winning TV journalist.Wife & Mommy; Mom Blogger; Social Media Coach; Long Island, New York transplant living in Atlanta, GA. Follow Joyce on Twitter @MommyTalkShow Author of Use What You Know: A Business Idea Guide for Moms featuring interviews with mompreneurs who created businesses using their skills & backgrounds.

Check Also

I'm Climbing Out of the Pit of Mommy Guilt after a Crappy 3rd Grade Year

[VIDEO] I’m Climbing Out of the Pit of Mommy Guilt After Our Son’s Crappy 3rd Grade Experience

I’m sorry that I kept this latest phase of our parenting journey off of the …

2 comments

  1. I hate asthma! Pookah’s is getting better, but during those winter months, I dread any type of cold or cough because I know it was lead to breathing treatments and dr’s visits. Hopefully they both grow out of it soon!
    Oh and don’t feel bad about freaking out about the vomit! I have may always have my nurse face on, but inside I ALWAYS freak out about vomit!

    • I know the nurses probably thought I was crazy. But I really can’t deal with vomit and imagine it STUCK inside their breathing masks. It was just too much for me.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.